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Attention Sushi Lovers: Tapeworm Now Found in U.S. Pink Salmon

in Video January 29, 2017

If you know what a tapeworm is the thought of it is likely something that makes you shudder. This is why we should be extremely cautious when buying things like salmon.

It has been confirmed that the Japanese broad tapeworm has made its way to the fish here in the US. This was done by means of the Asian Pacific and can definitely be considered means for alarm. Based on one study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology around 20 million people are believed to have tapeworms living inside of them.

Tapeworms are parasites that can live in humans as well as other mammals. They make their homes in our intestines and survive by eating the things we have ingested. They can segment themselves meaning one big tapeworm can break itself apart into several smaller independent tapeworms. The Japanese broad tapeworm can grow up to 30 feet.

Now, if for some reason you suspect you may have a tapeworm living inside of your there are several signs you can look for. These are things you should always keep an eye out for in yourself and others. Keep in mind sometimes you may not show any symptoms at all.

Infection Signs and Symptoms:

  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Vomiting
  • Intestinal obstruction
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Weight loss

Researchers have now found a tapeworm in wild pink salmon from the Alaskan Pacific. During a study in which five species of wild salmon were being analyzed (62 fish total) twenty-three of them were Pink Salmon. This team of researchers were able to find samples that contained larvae from the Japanese broad tapeworm. Below is a video shot of one of the very much alive tapeworms they found.

If you cannot avoid eating raw fish and feel like it is something you have to have. Be sure to take extra precautions to ensure you do not end up with a parasite. Freeze the fish for a few days as this will kill the tapeworms as well as any other parasites that may be living in your meal. (-4 degrees Fahrenheit or below for seven days will do the trick.)